Lower Thames Crossing consultation plans refined
Photo Credit To Highways England

Lower Thames Crossing consultation plans refined

Lower Thames Crossing consultation plans refined

Britain’s most ambitious roads project in a generation, the Lower Thames Crossing, will begin its next phase of public consultation next week, Highways England has announced yesterday.

The further consultation into the multi-billion pound Lower Thames Crossing, which will connect, Essex, Thurrock and Kent, will give people the opportunity to look at, and comment on, changes made to the project’s design.

These tweaks have been made following a combination of feedback received from 29,000 responses during the last consultation held in 2018, as well as new technical information following surveys and ground investigations.

The proposed Lower Thames Crossing project will be a 14.3-mile, 70mph new road, with the longest road tunnel in the UK beneath the country’s second longest river.

It will almost double road capacity across the Thames east of London, connecting communities, reducing delays and providing more reliable journeys.

Chris Taylor, Director of Highways England’s Complex Infrastructure Programme, said: “The Lower Thames Crossing is Highways England’s most ambitious scheme in 30 years, and we are designing a new route that will boost the local and regional economy, while providing quicker and more reliable journeys.

“We have made some changes to the design of the scheme based on new information, feedback from our consultation in 2018 and ongoing engagement with local the community and organisations. This further consultation is an opportunity for people to have their say on the changes before we submit our planning application later this year.”

Lower Thames Crossing consultation plans refined

The eight-week consultation will run from Wednesday 29 January 2020 to Wednesday 25 March.

People can respond to the consultation by visiting one of 20 events along the proposed route, by completing an online survey through the Lower Thames Crossing website, sending a form via Freepost, or sending an email.

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Post source : Highways England

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Anthony has worked in the construction industry for many years and looks forward to bringing you news and stories on the highways industry from all over the world.

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